Escape and Evasion (E&E) Bags for the Workplace

Some of you out there have taken Survival Think Tank's advice and constructed your bug-out-bags and check the contents often or at least on an annual basis. Many of us that are preparing for a future economic storm likely still have jobs and more than likely must attend work at least five days per week.

Chances are you may live or work in a very firearm UNfriendly environment. If this is the case, watch this video and get some ideas started on how you are going to build your E&E bag and what you are going to put inside to help you escape the area you are in and get to your full sized bag or at least closer to home.


As mentioned in the video, no bag is perfect and no bag will cover all the problems you may encounter. Many of us have bug-out-bags that are pretty large in size and may get us strange stares if we attempt to bring them to and from the workplace every day. Bringing your full-size bag into the workplace is also an OPSEC issue due to nosy coworkers. These small and lightweight E&E bags are only designed to get you to the rest of your gear and therefore will not be all inclusive. The bag in the above video is designed to be "work friendly" so you have a lesser chance at getting fired just for being prepared. Some employers have been known to have anti-survivalist policies and viewpoints.

4 comments:

  1. Love this, I was a safety manager at my work place, so I also got the job of doing weekly safety meeting for the shop. You can't do safety glasses every week, so one weekly because we had a small earthquake I hauled out my bug-out bag and did a safety meeting about being ready for the big one. What to keep at work and tailoring it to you walk home assuming you would have to walk home.
    One comment was "I wish I could do that"

    I like to use a good quality backpacks 16 oz nylon that the kids have used for a year of school the washing them and adding a list of thing like this, water, sun hat, rain wear, blanket, space blanket or tarp, snack food bars, AM/FM radio, head phones, Leatherman tool, flashlight, glow stick, walking stick, whistle, backpack, and compass.
    I only lived about 3.5 miles from work so the walk would be nothing, but the walking stick was more a defensive weapon it was a heavy putter. I pick it up at the second hand store a buck. I walk everywhere with one I used my walking stick to walk on the ice and snow, climb in to a drainage ditch, and move rock that could be hiding a snake. But because my route home crosses some gang areas it is important to look like just an old gray sheeple man, not worth the hassling. My kit is based on needing to walk up to 12 miles in a round about fashion to get home. I can send photos. my standard wear is a "lite gray tee shirt and shorts in the summer, camo or tan Wrangler cargo pants in the winter sometimes jeans but they never have enough pockets.
    My pocket kit contain a folding knife, flash light, knife sharpener, cuff key, pen, headphones, and a smartphone.

    ReplyDelete